Monday, April 26, 2010

Star Trek (2009) - Bitches

So I'm afraid there's not much in the way of a feminist review, this time around. After reviewing Zombie Land and Heavy Rain which had some horrible female characters, Star Trek goes boldly where many have gone before: no female characters. Okay, there were female characters, but none that we spent time really developing.





There's Uhura. We see her first in the third Kirk-centric scene, where he's at the bar flirting with her. She's intelligent and bored with him, until humorously surprised that Kirk is smart. She's up front, independent, and when a bunch of loserly red shirts come over to protect her she tells them she can handle it. And we were watching her do just that. Of course men being men they start fighting and she is turned into "that chick" who keeps yelling "stop!" But hey, she can't be perfect. (She's a woman.) After that we see her again on the ship, in passing, and then again as a student three years. All we see her do here is get naked, talking intelligence that we're not listening to. So we're more impressed with her mid-drift than that she's discovered and translated some Romulan frequency. I guess she couldn't really be in this movie if we weren't exploiting her, physically. What kind of film would we have then? One where we only get to see a green chick half naked? HEY NOT ONLY XENOPHILE TREKKIES ARE WATCHING THIS LET'S SEE A BLACK CHICK oh wait...damn it. No white nudity? What if we're not into interracial? Okay so anyways sorry the next scene with her is redeeming, however, as she tells Spock to put her on the Enterprise where she belongs, putting it at him he shouldn't have misplaced her just because he's afraid of showing favoritism. So this is the first kinda hint that they're together. I think the next one is when she chases after him after his mommy died. It's pretty clear here, but we do get to see them talk and make out before he finally goes off with Kirk to face Nero. At this point she's become a nondescript crew memeber, which I guess is fine, but why did they focus on her at all to begin with if that was the case? Comedy? Sort of love drama not really kind of heart...nothing. Female presence, I guess.





Spock's mom. Not a major character, but a great mom, so she's a good female character in that sense. However, she is a mom, like the other character is basically a body and a love-interest material, even though they both have redeeming qualities within their placement, their very placement is sexist. Women can only be a love-interest (even if she's strong and independent...ish) or a mom (even if she's a damn good one). It's also important to point out that it is his mom and not his dad that his the human, thus perfecting that the woman be the emotional side, whilst the man is the logical. It's probably important here to point out the film really had no choice here. Star Trek had already done this for them before they created the adaptation. Same with Uhura, really, if she wasn't an interesting female character in the originals. Then again, what do I know, maybe they changed this stuff about the characters, too?



So feministly speaking--that doesn't work...So, speaking of bitches, this film's undertones are that women are great as long as they stick to their roles. They are either sluts to bang (Green "she's tired of me bringing guys back here" Girl), Sexy Strong Girlfriend (Uhura), or Nuturing Emotional Mom (Spock's mommy). This part of the review, unlike the rest of the review, is actually talking about something film didn't spend any time caring about. They weren't trying to say anything about women, so only their unconscious or the previous Star Trek writers' unconscious spoke up about what they think/thought about women. Or all they cared to show of women to make the film approachable.

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